On The Main Blog

Creative Minority Reader

NY Times Profiles Celibate Gay Catholic

New York Times profiles Eve Tushnet and they don't know what to make of her. Check it out at Faith and Family Live:

The New York Times ran a nice profile of Eve Tushnet over the weekend.

Tushnet is a popular blogger with same-sex attraction who is happily accepting the fullness of Catholic teaching and its implications for her life.

It’s clear the Times doesn’t know what to make of her, choosing to emphasize her “strangeness.”
Continue reading>>>

Your Ad Here

3 comments:

Craig Dennis said...

There ARE some very strange things about Eve, unfortunately, as she openly disagrees with the Church (not to mention the bible's unambiguous clarity) on the idea that same-sex attraction is a disorder.

Her desire to be faithful is extremely admirable, and her celibacy is praiseworthy. But she defines herself, frequently, by her homosexuality, in a "good" way.

And she says that same sex attraction and improper sexual attraction is a positive contribution to friendly relationships, as in this wierd quote:
1) A friend of mine--a striking, very intelligent woman--has deeply reshaped my thinking and affected how I lead my life. I am pretty sure this relationship would have been less intense had I been heterosexual. (Note that I'm NOT saying straight women can't have intense same-sex friendships! Just that in this particular case, the fact that I found her attractive was part of the "energy" of the relationship.)

This is not good. I am married, and if I considered sexual attraction to a female friend as part of a positive "energy of the relationship" or anything other than something that should be avoided like the plague and then reverted through prayer to filial love, I am not just an idiot, I would be an adulterer.

Some of Eve Tushnet's ideas are dangerous to the faith, and can be easily tested and demonstrated erroneous simply by replacing them with married people or heterosexuals, whom orthodox Catholics aren't preoccupied with being "tolerant" and showing false charity towards.

Craig Dennis said...

BTW, I failed to put quotes around her quote about her friend. It starts at the #1 and ends at the end of that paragraph.

It can be found in the comments of an article of hers on inside catholic: http://insidecatholic.com/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6334&Itemid=48

People should not rely upon her ideas for a reliable source for a totally Catholic way of dealing with sinful desires. Generally, if someone doesn't acknowledge as a basic strategy running away from sin before you consider all other strategies, you are not listening to Christ's simple commands at your own great peril.

A Sinner said...

"she openly disagrees with the Church (not to mention the bible's unambiguous clarity) on the idea that same-sex attraction is a disorder."

First, the Church has never said "a" disorder. It's said "disordered." There's a big difference in connotation. One implies psychopathology, the other is simply a theological technicality (and a novel category used only since 1970, and only to describe homosexuality, according to a false understanding, anyway)

"Her desire to be faithful is extremely admirable, and her celibacy is praiseworthy. But she defines herself, frequently, by her homosexuality, in a 'good' way."

And??

"And she says that same sex attraction and improper sexual attraction is a positive contribution to friendly relationships"

It's "improper" if she wants to do something sexual with them, I suppose. Otherwise, who are you to say it doesn't contribute positively?

"This is not good. I am married, and if I considered sexual attraction to a female friend as part of a positive 'energy of the relationship' or anything other than something that should be avoided like the plague and then reverted through prayer to filial love, I am not just an idiot, I would be an adulterer."

And yet, without that very dynamic between Dante and Beatrice...we wouldn't have "The Divine Comedy."

So I suggest you drop your Jansenist Puritanism and engage the real world as an adult, with all its messy emotional ambiguity.


Popular Posts